Doctoral Researchers

 
Garbe, Enrico

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Institute/Dep.
Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology - Hans Knöll Institute (HKI)
Junior Research Group Host Fungal Interfaces
PhD Project:

Transcriptional control of environmental pH modulation in the fungal pathogen Candida albicans

 
 
Gore, Sagar

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ChemBioSys Student

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Institute/Dep.
Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology - Hans-Knöll-Institute-
Research Group: Systems Biology / Bioinformatics
PhD Project:

Pattern recognition methods for prediction of chemical structure of fungal secondary metabolites

 
 
Institute/Dep.
Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology - Hans-Knöll-Institute-
Junior Research Group
Chemistry of Microbial Communication
PhD Project:

Role of Amoebal Natural Products in Intra- and Interspecies Interactions

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Abstract: This project focuses on understanding the role of the signaling molecule glorin in the multicellular development of social amoebae. Social amoebae are soil-dwelling protists that live...
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... as single cells and feed on bacteria. Under certain environmental conditions such as food depletion, these single cells can enter a multicellular phase. Initial aggregation occurs by chemotactic movement through pulses or gradients of diffusible extracellular signal molecules known as ‘acrasins’. The best-characterized acrasin is cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) that coordinates of multicellular development in the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum. Another much different signaling machinery for multicellular development is based on the dipeptide glorin present in Polysphondylium pallidum. In contrast to the cAMP signaling in D. discoideum, the glorin signaling is yet barely understood with the glorin receptor being still unknown. Here, we wish to identify the glorin receptor by use of is an interdisciplinary combination of cell biological, biochemical and chemical biology methods. Starting from an already established route to synthesize glorin and glorin-derivatives, we will perform localization studies and photoaffinity labelling experiments in P. pallidum cells and cell extracts, respectively to search for the receptor. In a last step MS-based proteomic analyses to will reveal the sequence of glorin-binding proteins among which the glorin receptor finally will be identified. For confirmation, a glorin receptor null mutant will be generated in P. pallidum and the resulting phenotype will be characterized. In addition, heterologous expression in e.g. D. discoideum and further studies of the receptor will enable for deeper understanding of the signaling system development. In summary our studies will provide novel insights into a fundamental aspect of cellular communication as well as on the development of multicellularity and thus enable further studies directed towards cellular differentiation.