Doctoral Researchers

 
Mamerow, Svenja Katharina

publications »

Email »

Institute/Dep.
PhD Project:

Development and Evaluation of Influenza A Virus Live Attenuated Vaccines in Swine

 
 
Institute/Dep.
Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology - Hans-Knöll-Institute-
ZIK Septomics
Research Group Fungal Septomics
PhD Project:

Characterizing innate immune cell activation by fungal pathogens using Live Cell Imaging

 
 
Institute/Dep.
University Hospital Jena
Clinic of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine
Research Unit Experimental Anesthesiology
PhD Project:

Endoplasmatic reticulum turnover and outcome of sepsis

PDF »

Abstract: Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved strategy to respond to organelle damage. Stress events associated with infection, such as “pathogen-associated molecular pattern” receptor...
more
... signaling, hypoxia and redox changes, as well as protein unfolding are well known triggers to induce autophagy limiting the development of tissue injury and subsequent organ dysfunction. Damaged organelles, including ER are captured by the isolation membrane. The resulting autophagosome then fuses with lysosomes, initiating degradation and recycling. Consequently, autophagy and its manipulation by pathogens may modulate host resistance primarily via tissue damage control, and disease tolerance in the context of infection. The few experimental data available so far suggest beneficial effect via a mechanism involving components of the unfolded protein as well as autophagy damage response, e.g. the autophagy protein microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain-3B (LC3B) and the autophagy-related protein 7 (Atg7) primarily implying a role in mitophagy. Thus, mitophagy (and autophagy in general) might provide tissue damage control in parenchymal tissues conferring disease tolerance to sepsis, i.e. infection associated with an inappropriate host response characterized by organ dysfunction. Members of the reticulon protein family, i.e. FAM134, that act as ER-resident receptors binding autophagy modifiers such as LC3B have recently been shown to facilitate ‘ER-phagy’. FAM134B facilitated ER-phagy reflects a central housekeeping mechanism and its lack leads to sensory neuropathy. The FAM134 family of proteins consists of 3 isoforms with different tissue-specific expression patterns but their role under inflammatory stress conditions remains unknown. We hypothesize that these proteins differentially modulate tissue-specific stress responses upon life-threatening infections ultimately protecting against development of, or propagating resolution from multi-organ dysfunction associated with sepsis.
 
 
Mayer, Teresa

cv + contact data »

publications »

JSMC Fellow

Email »

Institute/Dep.
Friedrich Schiller University Jena
Junior Research Group Plant Microbiosis
PhD Project:

Whose microbiome is it? Adaptive interactions of keystone species in plant microbiomes

PDF »

Abstract: It is increasingly clear that microbe-microbe interactions play key roles in microbiome organization. Certain highly interactive microbes, identified as hubs in microbe-microbe...
more
... interaction networks, are keystone species in plant-associated microbial communities (i.e., underlie microbiome structures). “Keystoneness” could be characteristic of host symbionts (here broadly defined as close associates of hosts): Keystones tend to be more heritable than other colonizers and several symbionts have already been confirmed as keystones. Studying these organisms that interact strongly with both the host and its microbiota offers a chance to bridge the knowledge gap between plant-microbe evolution and ecology. This project will evaluate the hypothesis that the “plant microbiome” is a combination of the microbiomes of the host and its symbionts. The approach will move beyond typical microbial diversity characterization to investigate the role of symbionts in microbial community formation.
 
 
Institute/Dep.
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology
Dept. of Bioorganic Chemistry
PhD Project:

Using fluorescent Enterococcus mundtii to study the variation in its gene expression, spatially and temporally, in the gut of Spodoptera littoralis larva

PDF »

Abstract: Insects harbor a plethora of microorganisms within their gut, as their normal flora. They are not only non-pathogenic to them, but also have roles to play in the insect growth,...
more
... development and immunity. There lies a complex interaction within the microflora and also, between the host and the microorganisms. This leads to variations in the microbial population with the development of the insect. Some get eliminated, some are added, whereas, some dominate throughout the insect life cycle. The gut microbiota of Spodoptera littoralis, a Lepidopteran insect of family Noctuidae, has been elucidated. The core community consists of Enterococci, Lactobacilli and Clostridia. The selection of one bacterial species over the other is quite evident throughout the life-cycle. The community varies with the stages of development of the larva, and spatially within the gut. By the time the larva reaches the 5th instar stage, Enterococcus mundtii and Clostridia sp persists and dominates. The class IIa antimicrobial peptide- mundticin KS, produced by Enterococcus mundtii, acts against the invading bacteria, and exercises its predominance. This way, they help preserve the host gut microbiota, reduce infection in the host and enhance its health. A method of fluorophore-labelling of Enterococcus mundtii has been developed to show that it is the persistent and metabolically active species in the gut microbiota, which in turn, intrigues us to find out the importance of this symbiotic species. Thus, the aim of my project will be to isolate the fluorescent Enterococcus mundtii from various regions of the larval gut, across its developmental stages, and study the variation in their gene expression. The Next generation method of RNAseq will be used to sequence the transcriptome. Thus, on analyzing the transcriptome of Enterococcus mundtii over the stages of Spodoptera littoralis larval development, we might conclude its specific role as a symbiont and its importance as a dominating gut microbiota. Once successful, the approach can be extended to other relevant gut bacteria and their role as symbionts, like, Clostridia sp, which dominate the gut till the later stages of development, even in depleting iron conditions.
 
 
Meichsner, Doreen

cv + contact data »

publications »

JSMC Fellow

Email »

Institute/Dep.
Friedrich Schiller University Jena
Matthias Schleiden Institute
Dept. of Plant Physiology
PhD Project:

Symbiosis-specific exudate components from the beneficial root-colonizing fungus Piriformospora indica and Arabidopsis thaliana

PDF »

Abstract: In this project, we will study the beneficial interaction between the root-colonizing fungus Piriformospora indica and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The endophytic fungus P....
more
... indica colonizes of the roots of many plant species. Similar to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, P. indica promotes plant growth, biomass and seed production and confers resistance to biotic and abiotic stress (Shahollari et al., 2007, Vadassery et al., 2009, Camehl et al., 2011, Nongbri et al., 2012, and references therein). P. indica is a member of Sebacinales, grows inter - and intracellularly and forms pear shaped spores, which accumulate within the roots and on the root surface. After the establishment of a beneficial interaction, barely any defense or stress genes are activated and no reactive oxygen species are produced by the host against P. indica (Camehl et al., 2011). The endophyte releases a small compound into the medium/rhizosphere which induces root-specific [Ca2+]cyt elevation in Arabidopsis and N. tabacum. [Ca2+]cyt elevation is followed by a nuclear Ca2+ response (Vadassery et al., 2009), similar to signalling events in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.
Using established cultivation and co-cultivation conditions, we will try to identify proteins, peptides and other biomolecules which are released from the two partners into the medium. Comparative analyses of the secretomes and metabolomes (released by the microbial and plant partners alone and in symbiotic interaction between the two partners) should identify those compounds which are symbiosis-specific. Since the genomes of both organisms are sequenced and available, the origin of the proteins and peptides can be identified. Furthermore, genome mining should help to identify the origin and biosynthesis of the symbiosis-specific biomolecules.
 
 
Meyer, Nils

publications »

ChemBioSys Student

Email »

Institute/Dep.
Friedrich Schiller University Jena
Institute for Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry
PhD Project:

Algicidal Bacteria in Plankton Communities: Resistance, Lysis and Heterotrophy

 
 
Mirhakkak Esfahani, Mohammad

publications »

Email »

Institute/Dep.
Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology - Hans-Knöll-Institute-
Research Group: Systems Biology / Bioinformatics
PhD Project:

Integration of host, pathogen and microbiome -omics data in healthy and disease states

 
 
Mohr, Jan Frieder

cv + contact data »

publications »

ChemBioSys Student

Email »

Institute/Dep.
Friedrich Schiller University Jena
Institute for Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry
PhD Project:

Metallophores as mediators for metal cycling: Development of libraries for metal ion buffering and as redox carriers as well as profiling of metallophores

 
 
Müller, Tina

publications »

JSMC Fellow

Email »

Institute/Dep.
University Hospital Jena
Clinic of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine
Research Unit Experimental Anesthesiology
PhD Project:

Host defense mechanisms against pathogens mediated by sphingolipids

 
 
Munser, Anne-Sophie

publications »

Email »

Institute/Dep.
Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering, Jena
 
 
Murillo Roos, Mariana

cv + contact data »

publications »

ILRS Student

Email »

Institute/Dep.
Friedrich Schiller University Jena
Junior Research Group Plant Microbiosis
PhD Project:

Community resource availability as a driver of convergent microbe-microbe interaction types and microbial community structures